Past Seminars

Employing Innovative Approaches to Curation and Collections Management:  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Archaeological Curation Program

Registration Closed!

Employing Innovative Approaches to Curation and Collections Management: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Archaeological Curation Program

When: February 23, 2018 3:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Dr. Michael “Sonny” Trimble received his Ph.D. in anthropology, with a specialization in archaeology, from the University of Missouri, Columbia, in 1985. After completing a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship at the Newberry Library in Chicago, Dr. Trimble accepted a position with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), St Louis District in 1987. Dr. Trimble is the Chief of the Curation and Archives Analysis Branch within the Engineering Division of the USACE, St. Louis District, and the National Director of the Corps of Engineers’ Mandatory Center of Expertise for the Curation and Management of Archaeological Collections (MCX-CMAC) in St. Louis, MO.

Ms. Catherine “Kate” Leese received her M.A. in archaeology from the University of Leicester. She has previously served as a laboratory manager for the Veterans Curation Program (VCP), as well as the Project Manager of the VCP for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Ms. Leese currently serves as an Archaeologist and Contracting Officer’s Representative for the Corps of Engineers’ Mandatory Center of Expertise for the Curation and Management of Archaeological Collections (MCX-CMAC) in St. Louis, MO.
The recognition that the field of archaeology is based on scientifically-curated national collections is emerging as a core value of the archaeological community. The preservation and digitization of collections is now seen as key to the long term survival of the data that comprises the science of archaeology. While most archaeologists recognize curation and collections management are an integral component to the field, resource allocation for these collections has never adequately addressed the national need. This one-hour online seminar will address the function of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Mandatory Center of Expertise for the Curation and Management of Archaeological Collections (MCX-CMAC), the Veterans Curation Program (VCP), and the approach of data preservation and curation of public archaeological collections in the U.S. and how USACE has developed and implemented a national approach to managing these important cultural resources.
  1. Provide an introduction to archaeology and curation at the USACE, St. Louis District, MCX-CMAC.
  2. Discuss the curation efforts of the Veterans Curation Program (VCP).
  3. Advise participants of the considerations that must be given to:
  • The preparation of artifacts and archives
  • Selection of curation facilities
  • Accessibility of archaeological collections
  • Use of technology for the purposes of education and outreach

Geophysical Remote Sensing in Archaeology: An Overview and Practical Guide for Beginners and Intermediate Users, Teachers, and Consumers

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Geophysical Remote Sensing in Archaeology: An Overview and Practical Guide for Beginners and Intermediate Users, Teachers, and Consumers

When: January 22, 2018 2:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $139 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $179 for non-members


Jarrod Burks, Ph.D. is the Director of Archaeological Geophysics at Ohio Valley Archaeology, Inc. He has been conducting geophysical surveys on archaeology sites since 1998 in a wide variety of survey settings, both in terms of geology/soils and archaeological targets. He has published his research in national and international journals including American Antiquity, Archaeological Prospection, and the Journal of Archaeological Science. For the past two decades he has been an instructor at the National Park Service’s geophysics workshop for archaeology, hosted annually by the Midwest Archeological Center at a range of venues around the country.
Geophysics is finally starting to take hold in American archaeology, but there are very few opportunities for good training on how to operate the instruments, process the data, and interpret the results. The primary goal of this seminar is to provide a basic introduction to the fundamental principles of making geophysics work for archaeologists. We will focus on several basic components of good practice, including choosing an instrument, setting up a survey, collecting good data, basic data processing, and most important of all—data interpretation. A wide variety of examples and case studies will be used from all across the US, with an emphasis on the three instrument types commonly used in American archaeology: magnetometers, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistance meters. Doing good geophysics in archaeology is not about how many different instruments you can throw at a site, it’s about objectives and what you hope to achieve. So, it’s time to dust off that magnetometer that’s been sitting in the closet, charge up your geology colleague’s radar, and get yourself out in the field to collect some data!
After completing this course, participants will have a basic understanding of how to (1) collect, (2) process, and (3) interpret geophysical data from the three main instruments used by archaeologists: magnetometers, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistance meters. An emphasis will be placed on doing this with an archaeologist’s eye to understanding the archaeological record.

Knowledge Series: Anne Pyburn

Registration Closed!

Knowledge Series: Anne Pyburn

When: January 18, 2018 3:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: Not RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Anne Pyburn has been involved in archaeology since she was 9 years old. She has been involved in economic development since 1984, when she consulted for a Women in Development Project in Yemen for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). She recently co-edited a book on the subject of archaeology and development, called Collision or Collaboration: Archaeology Encounters Economic Development. She has done archaeologically-based development projects in Belize and Kyrgyzstan. She is currently Provost’s Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University.
Archaeologists frequently cite economic development as a possible positive outcome of their research, despite increasing evidence that such programs often have problems with resource allocation, shifting government priorities, participant competition and conflict, and sustainability. While there are no hard and fast guidelines that lead to success across all cultural contexts, there are some basic considerations that may improve outcomes. In this course, Anne Pyburn will summarize and critique her own efforts to ally archaeology to economic development in Belize and in Kyrgyzstan as a prelude to outlining some useful rules of engagement for other archaeologists hoping to contribute to developing economies. In particular, she will consider the model of common pool resources elaborated by economist Elinor Ostrom and recently developed for archaeological application by Peter Gould.
The Knowledge Series seminars are opportunities to learn from prominent archaeologists as they share their experiences and expertise.

Ancient DNA 101: What You Need to Know to Establish a Successful Project

Registration Closed!

Ancient DNA 101: What You Need to Know to Establish a Successful Project

When: December 12, 2017 12:00-2:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $139 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $179 for non-members


Courtney Hofman is an assistant professor of Anthropology and co-director at the University of Oklahoma's Laboratories of Molecular Anthropology and Microbiome Research. Dr. Hofman has conducted research that integrates interdisciplinary methods and fields, including genomics, ancient DNA, proteomics, and archaeology to explore human-environment interactions on two very different scales. First, she investigates human-wildlife interactions and their influence on changing environments over the past millennia to inform conservation decisions. Second, Dr. Hofman conducts research on the evolution of the human microbiome using dental calculus and paleofeces from archaeological contexts. Dr. Hofman completed her PhD at the University of Maryland in collaboration with the Center for Conservation Genomics at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and the Anthropology department at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, where she is also a research associate.

Dr. Christina Warinner is Group Leader of Microbiome Sciences in the Department of Archaeogenetics at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and a Presidential Research Professor and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Oklahoma, where she co-founded the Laboratories of Molecular Anthropology and Microbiome Research. Dr. Warinner earned her PhD at Harvard University in 2010 and completed her postdoctoral training at the Centre for Evolutionary Medicine at the University of Zürich, Switzerland. She has conducted ancient DNA research for more than a decade, and has published pioneering studies in human migration, Native American ancestry, ancient diet, and the reconstruction of the ancestral human microbiome. Her ancient microbiome findings were named among the top 100 scientific discoveries of 2014 by Discover Magazine, and her research has been featured in more than 75 news articles, including stories in Science, Scientific American, the LA Times, the Guardian, and CNN, among others. She has been featured in multiple documentaries, and her recent work on the peopling of the Himalayas appears in the PBS NOVA special Secrets of the Sky Tombs and the award-winning children’s book Secrets of the Sky Caves. She is a 2014 US National Academy of Sciences Kavli Fellow and a 2012 TED Fellow, and her TED Talks on ancient dental calculus and the evolution of the human diet have been viewed more than 2 million times.
Recent technological advances in genetics, such as high-throughput sequencing (HTS), have radically transformed ancient DNA (aDNA) research, making it more accessible and affordable for archaeologists than ever before. This seminar will provide a brief introduction to the field of paleogenomics, with an emphasis on the range of questions that can be addressed using current technologies, as well as some potential challenges. We will also explore how much an aDNA study actually costs and the role of student training in aDNA labs. Participants will learn how to identify questions that are amenable to genetic analysis and acquire strategies for how to set up successful collaborations with aDNA labs.
  1. Provide an update on major changes in ancient DNA technologies over the past 5 years.
  2. Highlight the range of questions that current ancient DNA methods can investigate.
  3. Address challenges in ancient DNA research, such as sample preservation and data authentication.
  4. Provide strategies for identifying potential research partners and establishing successful collaborations with aDNA labs.
  5. Discuss the structural differences between how research and training is conducted within the fields of archaeology and genetics, and how this impacts ancient DNA research.
  6. Establish the importance of hypothesis-driven research, and dispel the “Doing the DNA” myth.

Making Your Voice Heard in Support of Archaeology

Registration Closed!

Making Your Voice Heard in Support of Archaeology

When: December 06, 2017 3:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: Not RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Amy Rutledge is currently the manager, Communications and Fundraising for the Society for American Archaeology. Prior to joining SAA, she worked in creative and strategic communications for a variety of non-profit and philanthropic organizations, tackling a range of issues from humane livestock farming to smart growth. Before joining the non-profit field, Amy was a video post-production manager in the Washington, D.C. market working with a variety of clients, including several political clients, National Geographic, and Discovery Communications. She has a B.A. in Film and Video from American University and an M.A. in English from Iowa State University.
Increasingly, archaeologists have been looking for ways to advocate for their field and their research to a public audience. With concerns about funding cuts and with cultural resource protections and regulations facing an uncertain future, archaeologists need to write and speak through non-scholarly media to build support for and knowledge about archaeology. This one-hour seminar helps participants understand the tools and pathways for making their voices heard in defense of archaeology. The course focuses on writing op-eds for newspapers and working with non-traditional media outlets. It provides a guide for building communications networks to heighten visibility of archaeological issues and research.
The objective for this course is to provide participants with strategies for effectively communicating to the public in support of archaeological research. The course will build an understanding of how and why to work with newspapers, blogs, and social media. The goal is to increase visibility and advocacy of the field.